Audiobook Review: How the Word is Passed by Clint Smith

Beginning in his own hometown of New Orleans, Clint Smith leads the reader through an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks-those that are honest about the past and those that are not-that offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping our nation's collective history, and ourselves.It is the story of the... Continue Reading →

Audiobook Review: Without You, There is no Us by Suki Kim

A haunting memoir of teaching English to the sons of North Korea's ruling class during the last six months of Kim Jong-il's reignEvery day, three times a day, the students march in two straight lines, singing praises to Kim Jong-il and North Korea: Without you, there is no motherland. Without you, there is no us.... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Hiding in Plain Sight by Sarah Kendzior

The rise of Donald Trump may have shocked Americans, but it should not have surprised them. His anti-democratic movement is the culmination of a decades-long breakdown of U.S. institutions. The same blindness to U.S. decline – particularly the loss of economic stability for the majority of the population and opportunity-hoarding by the few – is... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?In this ambitious survey of the last century of American history,... Continue Reading →

ARC Review: Four Hundred Souls – A Community History of African America 1619-2019 Edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain

Curated by Ibram X. Kendi, author of the number one bestseller How To Be an Antiracist, and fellow historian Keisha N. Blain, Four Hundred Souls begins with the arrival of twenty enslaved Ndongo people on the shores of the British colony in mainland America in 1619, the year before the arrival of the Mayflower.In eighty chronological chapters, the book... Continue Reading →

Graphic Novel Review: March – Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans... Continue Reading →

ARC Review: Against Civility by Alex Zamalin

The idea and practice of civility has always been wielded to silence dissent, repress political participation, and justify violence upon people of color. Although many progressives today are told that we need to be more polite and thoughtful, less rancorous and angry, when we talk about race in America, civility maintains rather than disrupts racial injustice. Spanning... Continue Reading →

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