Book Review: Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes

With three hit shows on television and three children at home, the uber-talented Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywood party? No. Speaking engagement? No. Media appearances? No. And there was the side benefit of saying No for an introvert like Shonda: nothing new to fear.... Continue Reading →

Advertisements

Audiobook Review – Shortest Way Home: One Mayor’s Challenge and a Model for America’s Future by Pete Buttigieg

Once described by the Washington Post as “the most interesting mayor you’ve never heard of,” Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-seven-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has now emerged as one of the nation’s most visionary politicians. With soaring prose that celebrates a resurgent American Midwest, Shortest Way Home narrates the heroic transformation of a “dying city” (Newsweek) into nothing less... Continue Reading →

Audiobook Review: Good Talk by Mira Jacob

“Who taught Michael Jackson to dance?”  “Is that how people really walk on the moon?” “Is it bad to be brown?”  “Are white people afraid of brown people?” Like many six-year-olds, Mira Jacob’s half-Jewish, half-Indian son, Z, has questions about everything. At first they are innocuous enough, but as tensions from the 2016 election spread... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitled: 'Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race' that led to this book. Exploring... Continue Reading →

Audiobook Review: Karamo – My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope by Karamo Brown

When Karamo Brown first auditioned for the casting directors of Netflix’s Queer Eye, he knew he wouldn’t win the role of culture expert by discussing art and theater. Instead he decided to redefine what ‘culture’ could — and should — mean for the show. He took a risk and declared, ‘I am culture.' Karamo believes that culture... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Nazi Officer’s Wife by Edith Hahn Beer and Susan Dworkin

“We had lived until yesterday in a rational world. Now everyone around us—our schoolmates, neighbors, and teachers; our tradesmen, policemen, and bureaucrats—had all gone mad. They had been harboring a hatred for us which we had grown accustomed to calling “prejudice.” What a gentle word that was! What a euphemism! In fact they hated us... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: